Another Study, Another Reason to Drink Red Wine – washingtonpost.com

 In the last month we’ve been given two reasons to drink red wine. First it was the resveratrol which was keeping overweight, out of shape mice young now it’s procyanidins…

In the latest research, Roger Corder of Queen Mary’s School of Medicine in London and colleagues analyzed various components of red wine. They found that substances called procyanidins appeared to have the most potent beneficial effect on the cells that enable arteries to power the heart.

Moreover, the researchers discovered that levels of procyanidins were highest in red wines produced in southwestern France, where French men tend to live the longest, according to a report in today’s issue of the journal Nature.

Just for the record the article also mentioned dark chocolate, apples and cranberries as suppliers of procyanidins. Looks like a menu made for the holidays…I would like to know more about the diet of these men from southwestern France though.

Source: Another Study, Another Reason to Drink Red Wine – washingtonpost.com

Another Study, Another Reason to Drink Red Wine – washingtonpost.com

 In the last month we’ve been given two reasons to drink red wine. First it was the resveratrol which was keeping overweight, out of shape mice young now it’s procyanidins…

In the latest research, Roger Corder of Queen Mary’s School of Medicine in London and colleagues analyzed various components of red wine. They found that substances called procyanidins appeared to have the most potent beneficial effect on the cells that enable arteries to power the heart.

Moreover, the researchers discovered that levels of procyanidins were highest in red wines produced in southwestern France, where French men tend to live the longest, according to a report in today’s issue of the journal Nature.

Just for the record the article also mentioned dark chocolate, apples and cranberries as suppliers of procyanidins. Looks like a menu made for the holidays…I would like to know more about the diet of these men from southwestern France though.

Source: Another Study, Another Reason to Drink Red Wine – washingtonpost.com

What were the virtues of borage? – Herbal Folklore

I started reading KillerPlants a long tme ago, and still I find the daily emails informative. I discovered Borage quite a while ago also, and the flavoe of the flowers is still a delight ever time I taste one…
What were the virtues of borage? – Herbal Folklore: “Cool-tankard is now commonly known as borage (Borago officinalis Linnaeus). In A Modern Herbal (1931), Mrs. Grieve explains the use, ‘When steeped in water, it imparts a coolness to it and a faint cucumber flavour, and compounded with lemon and sugar in wine,…it makes a refreshing and restorative summer drink. It was formerly always an ingredient in cool tankards of wine and cider.'”

Study: Red wine cuts high-fat diet dangers in mice | Chron.com – Houston Chronicle

So maybe Marie Antoinette had it right when she said “let them eat cake”. Pour me a glass with that cupcake please…
Study: Red wine cuts high-fat diet dangers in mice | Chron.com – Houston Chronicle: “Huge amounts of a red wine extract seemed to help obese mice eat a high-fat diet and still live a long and healthy life, suggests a new study that some experts are calling ‘landmark’ research.

The big question is, can it work the same magic in humans?

Scientists say it’s far too early to start swilling barrels of red wine. But some are calling the latest research promising and even ‘spectacular.'”

Mediterranean Diet

More good news about the Mediterranean Diet…

Mediterranean Diet May Keep Alzheimer’s at Bay – washingtonpost.com: “Scientists have produced more evidence for the health benefits of eating a ‘Mediterranean diet’: It apparently can help protect your brain.

The diet consists of lots of fruits, vegetables, legumes, cereals, olive oil and fish, and small amounts of red meat and dairy products. Previous studies have found that such a diet appears to reduce the risk of a variety of diseases, including cancer, heart disease and diabetes, and raised the possibility that it might also reduce the odds of getting Alzheimer’s disease.”

I notice they don’t mention the wine that goes with every meal in the area…

Eat Local

This months issue of Mother Jones has an article on Polyface Farm and Joel Salatin. His comments on farming and politics really speak to me.

No Bar Code: ““We don’t have to beat them,” Joel patiently explained. “I’m not even sure we should try. We don’t need a law against McDonald’s or a law against slaughterhouse abuse—we ask for too much salvation by legislation. All we need to do is empower individuals with the right philosophy and the right information to opt out en masse.

“And make no mistake: it’s happening. The mainstream is splitting into smaller and smaller groups of like-minded people. It’s a little like Luther nailing his 95 theses up at Wittenberg. Back then it was the printing press that allowed the Protestants to break off and form their own communities; now it’s the Internet, splintering us into tribes that want to go their own way.””

One of the things we always do when we come to Boone is visit the Watauga County Farmers Market, which is pretty much what they are talking about here. Buy local, get to know the local producers it’s the best protection you have to insure the quality of your food.

I really liked the term Joel used in the following quote to equate the production of food to the ecology of the area the farm is located in:

“No, I don’t think you understand. I don’t believe it’s sustainable—‘organic,’ if you will—to FedEx meat all around the country,” Joel told me. “I’m afraid if you want to try one of our chickens, you’re going to have to drive down here to pick it up.”

This man was serious. He went on to explain that Polyface does not ship long distance, does not sell to supermarkets, and does not wholesale its food. All of the meat and eggs that Polyface produces is eaten within a few dozen miles or, at the most, half a day’s drive of the farm—within the farm’s “foodshed.”

I think I really like that term “foodshed”, pretty much says every thing you need to say…If you are in the “foodshed” of Polyface Farm you might want to check’em out. This is the kind of grassroots action that could just take-off (after half a century of trying).